The History of the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society

Published on : 10 February 20234 min reading time

The Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society was founded in London in 1887 by a group of artists, designers and patrons of the arts, including William Morris, John Ruskin and C.R. Ashbee. The society was formed in reaction to the growing trend of mass production and the decline in standards of craftsmanship. The society held its first exhibition in 1888, which was a great success, and went on to hold regular exhibitions throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The society helped to promote and develop the Arts and Crafts Movement, and its exhibitions were a major source of inspiration for many artists and designers, including Charles Rennie Mackintosh and Frank Lloyd Wright.

The Beginnings of the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society

In 1887, a group of like-minded artists and designers came together to form the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society. Their goal was to promote and showcase works that were created with an emphasis on craftsmanship and design. The society held its first exhibition in 1888, and it was a huge success. Over the next few years, the society continued to grow and held exhibitions in London, Birmingham, and Glasgow. The Arts and Crafts movement was in full swing, and the society played a key role in promoting it. In 1896, the society merged with another organization to form the Arts and Crafts Society, which continued to promote the arts and crafts movement until it disbanded in 1904.

The Aims of the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society

The Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society was founded in 1887 by a group of artists, designers, and patrons of the arts who were dissatisfied with the state of the art world in England. The Society’s goal was to promote and support the work of artists and craftspeople who were working in the Arts and Crafts style, and to educate the public about their work. The Society held its first exhibition in 1888, and it was a huge success. Over the next few years, the Society held several more exhibitions, and its members began to gain international recognition. In 1897, the Society merged with another organization, the National Arts and Crafts Society, and its name was changed to the Arts and Crafts Society of London. The Society continued to hold exhibitions and support the work of Arts and Crafts artists and craftspeople until it was disbanded in 1916.

The Growth of the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society

The Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society was founded in 1888 by a group of English artists and designers, including William Morris, John Ruskin, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti. The Society was created in response to the growing popularity of the Great Exhibition of 1851, which had showcased mass-produced goods from around the world. The Society’s goal was to promote the work of artists and craftsmen who were creating handmade, unique items. The Society held its first exhibition in 1889, and it was a huge success. Over the next few years, the Society’s exhibitions became increasingly popular, and they began to attract attention from international audiences. In 1897, the Society held its first exhibition in the United States, and in 1900, it held its first exhibition in Japan. Today, the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society is still going strong, and its exhibitions are some of the most highly anticipated events in the art world.

The Legacy of the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society

The Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society was founded in London in 1888 by a group of artists, designers, and educators who were committed to promoting the work of contemporary artists and craftsmen and to championing the principles of the Arts and Crafts movement. The Society staged regular exhibitions of work by members of the Arts and Crafts community, and its members included some of the most influential figures in the British art world, such as William Morris, John Ruskin, and Dante Gabriel Rossetti. The Society was instrumental in raising awareness of the Arts and Crafts movement and in helping to shape its aesthetic. The legacy of the Arts and Crafts Exhibition Society endures in the work of the many artists and craftsmen who were associated with the Society and in the continued appreciation of the Arts and Crafts aesthetic.

Plan du site